Tags: CALCULATE

Ensure that “Show Value as” feature of the Pivot Table works even when some Pivot Table columns are unfiltered/hidden

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Let's say the data sheet has Sales and Profit data by Product, Region, Salesman and Date.  One may want to analyse the following via a Pivot Table

"The Sales Delta by year, month, salesman and product i.e. for May 2012, compute the [Sales in May 2012] less [Sales in May 2011] for every salesman and product.  Do the same for every month for two year (2012 and 2013)."

While this is easy to accomplish using the "Show Value As" feature of a Pivot Table, the problem arises when a particular year is filtered out from the Pivot Table.  This activity of filtering out a year from the Pivot Table causes the other computed Sales Delta figures to vanish.

This problem can be overcome by creating a Pivot Table from the PowerPivot tool of Excel 2010 and higher versions.

You may refer to the question, Pivot Table attempt and PowerPivot solution in this workbook.

Compute Pro rata growth rate within a Pivot Table

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Assume a four column input data range (refer sheet named "Input" of this workbook) arranged as follows:

1. First tow columns are Group and Type which have text values
2. Third column is a month column with entries such as Dec_11 and Sep_12.  These denote 12 months ended December 2011 and 9 months ended 2012
3. Fourth column is Revenue which has numbers

The objective is to compute pro rata growth rate of Sep_12 revenue over Dec_11 revenue within a Pivot Table.  In the workbook (see link above), I tried to use a calculated item formula within a Pivot Table to compute this but encountered three difficulties in doing so (refer Notes section of sheet named "Result of Calc item formula ").

There are two ways one can go about answering the questions above:

Solution A – For Excel 2010 and higher versions – This solution is for those using the PowerPivot MS Excel add-in for Excel 2010 and higher versions.

Solution B – For all versions of MS Excel – This solution will work in all versions of MS Excel but for those using Excel 2010 and higher versions, the PowerPivot solution would be far more efficient.

The steps for creating a pivot table under Solution B are:

The Objective is to change the orientation of the base data such that a calculated field formula can be written within a Pivot table instead of a calculated item formula.  The process to change the orientation of the base data is described below:

1. Select range A2:D14 of Input sheet and press Ctrl+F3 > New.  In the name box, type Dummy
2. Select range A2:D14 of Input sheet and press Ctrl+T to convert to a Table
3. Open a third worksheet in the workbook (downloaded from the link above) and save the workbook, say on any folder on the desktop
4. While the active cell is any cell of the new worksheet, go to Data > From Other Sources > From Microsoft Query
5. Under Databases, select Excel files > OK
6. In the Directories dialog box, navigate to the folder on the desktop where the workbook is saved.  So for me, it is saved under C:\Users\Ashish\Desktop\ and click on the folder where the workbook is saved
7. In the left hand side window, select the workbook and click on OK
8. With Dummy selected, click on the > symbol to bring over all columns of this named range to the right hand side box
9. Click on Next three times
10. Select the option of View Data or Edit Query in Microsoft Query
11. Click on the SQL button and delete whatever you see in the box there
12. Enter the following SQL statement in the white box

Transform sum(rev)
SELECT Dummy.`GROUP`, Dummy.TYPE
FROM Dummy
Group by Dummy.`GROUP`, Dummy.TYPE
Pivot Mth

13. When you click on OK, you will see a four column database (refer sheet named "Result of MS Query")
14. Under File, select the last option – Return Data to Microsoft Excel
15. At this stage, if you wish to get data as you saw in MS Query then select Table.  If you directly want a pivot table, select the second option button – Pivot Table.  Select any cell where you would like to the result to appear, say cell A1. 16. Click on OK.  A counter will run at the bottom left hand side with the title of Reading Data
17. If you had selected pivot table in step 15 above, then the pivot table grid/layout will appear
18. You may now drag fields to create a pivot table
19. You may now write a calculated field formula within the Pivot Table (refer sheet named "Output")

As can be observed in the "Output" sheet, all the shortcomings mentioned in the Notes section of the "Result of Calc item formula" sheet have been overcome.

Analysing customer walkin data by date and service taken

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Assume data is in range A3:E10.  In A4:A10, various service types are mentioned.  In B3:E3, dates are mentioned from June 1, 2012 to June 4, 2012.  In range B4:E10 are numbers representing number of customers.  One may want to answer the following questions from this data:

1. For every date, total number of customer walkins and total number of services taken; and
2. For every date, new customer walkins and new services taken; and
3. For every date, repeat customer walkins and repeat services taken

While the first and third questions are fairly straight forward to solve, some deliberation would be required for the second question.  A new service type taken on June 3, 2012 would be one that has not been taken by any customer from June 1 - 2, 2012.  So if cell A8 has Service type E and cell D8 (data for June 3, 2012) has 3 (3 customer took service type E on June 3, 2012), then this service should be counted only if there is no figure in range B8:C8 i.e. no customer took this service on June 1 - June 2, 2012.

Depending upon the version of MS Excel which you are using, there could be two ways to solve this problem

Solution for MS Excel 2010 and higher versions

If you are using the Power Query add-in and the PowerPivot add-in, then a few simple steps and minimal DAX formulas can solve this problem.  The result will be dynamic and refreshable (just as in a Pivot Table).

Solution for all versions of MS Excel

While this solution works for all versions of MS Excel, it uses an array formula (Ctrl+Shift+Enter).  Array formulas, if used extensively in the workbook, adversely effect the system's performance.

You may refer to my solution in the this workbook.

Computing growth % inside a pivot table

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Having created a Pivot Table from a Base_Data sheet, one may want to compute the Account wise and Growth % of 2010 over 2009.

There are two ways one can go about answering the question above:

Solution A – For Excel 2010 and higher versions – This solution is for those using the PowerPivot MS Excel add-in for Excel 2010 and higher versions.

Solution B – For all versions of MS Excel – This solution will work in all versions of MS Excel but for those using Excel 2010 and higher versions, the PowerPivot solution would be far more efficient.

The steps for creating a pivot table under Solution B are:

1. Select cell C4 on the sheet "Pivot Table"
2. Go to Pivot Table Tools > Options > Fields, Items and Sets > Calculate Item.  In Excel 2007, this will be Pivot Table Tools > Options > Formulas > Calculated Item
3. In the Name box, type Growth
4. In the Formula bar, enter =('2010' /'2009' )-1 and press OK
5. Select the Growth column in the pivot table and press Ctrl+Shift+5 to convert the decimals to percentages

The problem with the above process is that the Growth % in the Grand Total column (cell D10) will be incorrect i.e. -31.93%.  Unfortunately, this is the simple summation of the Growth % above.  Ideally, this should be 1.77%and it should be computed as:

=(323,332-317,718)/317,718

First of all, this problem is happening because cell D10 is at the intersection of two formulas - one is Excel's default SUM function for the Grand Total column and the other is the calculated field formula created above.  We need to prioritise the application of formula on this particular cell i.e. the Growth % formula written above should take precedence over the default SUM function.  To accomplish this, try the following steps:

1. Right click on cell A10 (Grand Total) and select Remove Grand Total
2. Select cell A9 and go to Pivot Table Tools > Options > Fields, Items and Sets > Calculate Item.  In Excel 2007, this will be Pivot Table Tools > Options > Formulas > Calculated Item
3. In the Name box, type Total
4. In the Formula bar, enter =Ret Sales + Met Sales + Det Sales + Fet Sales + Get Sales.  You can do so by double clicking on the individual items available
5. After performing the steps above, the problem would be the same as we had earlier i.e. the Growth % in cell D10 will show -31.93%
6. To prioritise calculations in cell D10, try this:
a. Select any one cell in the pivot table and go to Pivot Table Tools > Options > Fields, Items and Sets > Solve Order.  In Excel 2007, this will be Pivot Table Tools > Options > Formulas > Solve Order
b. Select the first item and click on Move Down
c. Click on Close

The Growth % in cell D10 should now appear as 1.77%.

Change in growth from -31.93% to 1.77%!!!!!!

Remove duplicates after satisfying additional conditions

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Assume a two column database of patient ID's and service availed.  One patient may avail the same service multiple times in a year due to which that record may appear as many times as the service is availed.  For e.g., if patient A001 avails the Radiology service twice, then A001 and Radiology will appear in two rows.

Once may want to create the following two reports from this database:

1. A list containing all those records where the patient availed just one service; and
2. A list containing all those records where the patient availed more than one service

Depending upon the version of MS Excel which you are using, there could be two ways to solve this problem

Solution for MS Excel 2010 and higher versions

If you are using the PowerPivot add-in, then a calculated column formula can resolve this problem.

Solution for all versions of MS Excel

I have shared two solutions here:

1. Array formula and advanced filters; and
2. Only array formulas

For better understanding of the question and to view the final solution, please refer to this workbook.